Queen of Chess: Polgár beats Kasparov

This first instance, in any sport, that the #1 women’s player in the world beat the #1 men’s player, took place in September 2002, when Judit Polgár defeated Garry Kasparov in chess. The NFT, released by Judit Polgár in collaboration with BarabásiLab, commemorates this unique moment in history. The artwork replays the historic game, with Polgár’s white and Kasparov’s black pieces moving on the opposite side of the chessboard, reminding us that for decades women and men rarely competed against each other. The 3D art allows the viewer to view the game from either player’s perspective. The proceeds go to the Judit Polgar Chess Foundation, and the first owner will have the opportunity to play a private chess game with Polgár.

The Hungarian Institutional Network

Shown in the “BarabásiLab: Hidden Patterns” exhibit in the Ludwig Museum in Budapest, The Hungarian Institutional Network offers a data-driven perspective of the Hungarian art scene. In the map, two institutions—a museum or a gallery—are connected if an artist whose work was exhibited at the museum is also exhibited at the gallery. The map captures the largely invisible web of trust and influence between institutions and indicates how institutional prestige and hidden connections determine access to opportunities for artists. ©BarabásiLab (Contributors: A.-L. Barabási, L. Bérczi, Cs. Both, A. Grishchenko, M Janosov, I. Részegh, A. Olajos, A. Zalavari, Data: IKON, ArtNet, ArtFacts).

SuperRare Secondary Market

How does value emerge in CryptoArt? “SuperRare Secondary Market” captures the exploding secondary market, mapped for The New York Times essay "The Art World Usually Works in Secret. Here’s a Look Inside,” 5/7/21. Each node is an NFT re-sold on SuperRare between April 2018 and April 2021, shown in the order in which the works were minted. Artworks are linked to all art owned by the same collector. Colors highlight the art collected by the top 20 collectors, listed in tags, and appearing as distinguishable clusters with distinct colors. Go to art.barabasilab.com/nft/ to see the individual collectors and artists on the map. ©BarabásiLab (Milán Janosov and Albert-László Barabási).

The Artists of SuperRare

What is the well of creativity in Cryptoart? It is the artists and “The Artists of SuperRare” is a homage to them. The map shows all artists on SupeRare and how their work is connected. The network was mapped for The New York Times essay "The Art World Usually Works in Secret. Here’s a Look Inside,” published on 5/7/21. The nodes on the map correspond to NFTs sold on SuperRare between April 2018 and April 2021, capturing both primary and secondary sales. Each artwork is linked to all art owned by the same collector. The vibrating colors highlight a different group of artists among the top 50 creators - go to art.barabasilab.com/nft/ to identify the individual artists on the map. ©BarabásiLab (Milán Janosov and Albert-László Barabási).

Nft Universe

Value in art is created by invisible networks.

The NFT Universe captures the invisible web of SuperRare, mapped for The New York Times essay "The Art World Usually Works in Secret. Here’s a Look Inside.” published on 5/7/21.

The map shows each NFT sold on SuperRare between April 2018 and April 2021, linked to all NFTs once owned by the same collector. Colors highlight the collection of the top 20 collectors.

©BarabásiLab (Milán Janosov and A-LB).